MENU
-------------
-------------
-------------
Hey Welcome! I’m Crispina ffrench
Artist, Educator, Empowerer, Plant Eater,
Nature Lover, Cookie Baker, Climate Change Activist
I’m glad you are here, Now let’s make shift happen.

Scrapbox Contestants - Rebecca Hatcher

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

1. Tell our readers a little about you, and your history, your passion, your work.
I’m primarily a knitter, but in the past several years I have been sewing more and more of my own clothes--at first this was just to have clothes that I liked, but more recently I’ve been buying all my fabric from creative reuse stores, so it’s become a way to have a more sustainable wardrobe too. One of my favorite things about knitting (besides knitting itself), is that so many yarn stores and dyers are small businesses, and that it’s possible to choose yarn that aligns with anything you believe in.  I also love that you can keep unraveling and reknitting your yarn till it’s exactly right.  Outside of crafting, I’m a runner and a rower, and a librarian at a rare book library.  

2. Talk about your first awareness of textile recycling.
I don’t remember a specific first time I learned about textile recycling, probably reading about making quilts from scraps in a book (Anne of Green Gables? Little House in the Big Woods?).  One of the first things you learn about the history of the book (remember, I’m a librarian at a rare book library), is that paper used to be made from recycled rags, but is now made of wood.  Besides all the environmental consequences, the switch from rags to wood lowered the quality of paper, putting most documents from the mid-19th century to mid-20th century at risk.  There were benefits, of course, since paper became cheap enough that everyone could afford books and newspapers, but the product itself was worsened by using new materials.  Learning about that as a grad student was probably one of the first times I realized that a recycled product could be better than one made from new materials.

3. How did you learn about Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.
I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge via Instagram.  

4. What has participation in the challenge meant to you, and why.  Be honest.
The timing of the challenge coincided exactly with the start of the pandemic and start of social distancing in my state, so in general it’s been a wonderful break from thinking about that.  In fact, I think I entered the lottery thinking that if I got a box, playing with that would be a good counterbalance to the cancellation of the spring sheep and wool festivals, which are usually a highlight of this time of year for me.  

It’s also been really inspiring to what everyone else did with their boxes.  I’m usually pretty product-oriented, but the combination of seeing what other people made, the contest itself, and the feeling that I was supposed to experiment has led me to play around more with the contents of the box than I usually do when I knit or sew.  I’m thrilled with my finished bag (which I’ve been imagining myself filling with wool at a future sheep and wool festival), but I’m also excited about continuing to play with the projects I didn’t finish, or even figure out exactly what they are: a basket I wove out of some of my many zippers (it looks really cool, but it’s floppy, scratchy, and held together with pins… what will it be?), and a pom-pom I made from felted sweaters (oops, it looks like one of those dish scrubbers that are basically a foam pom-pom on a plastic handle).

5. What are your two biggest struggles?
I tend to feel like I should finish my “assignments” (work, housework, exercise…) before doing activities that are just for me, so I don’t knit or sew as much as I’d like, because the assignment expands to fill more time.  

I also tend to replay conversations and interactions where I misunderstood someone or accidentally said something insensitive or too harsh, criticizing myself up for having messed up.  I have enough distance to know that it’s never as bad as I think, and to separate myself from the self-criticism, but gosh, it would be easier not to think that way at all!

6. Three things that bring you joy.  Explain
Getting lost in making things, because then I’m only thinking about what I’m doing right then (or will do next).

Making something useful or beautiful out of what seems to be nothing--it’s like magic.  

Blocking and ironing (or steaming), because even more than knitting or sewing in the first place, they transform all the stitches or pieces from separate entities which you stuck together into a single whole.  

7. How can Crispina serve you as we venture forward in this uncertain time?
Show interesting, creative, beautiful things/ideas/practices that help to make the world we want and need.

Scrapbox Contestants - Rebecca Hatcher

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

1. Tell our readers a little about you, and your history, your passion, your work.
I’m primarily a knitter, but in the past several years I have been sewing more and more of my own clothes--at first this was just to have clothes that I liked, but more recently I’ve been buying all my fabric from creative reuse stores, so it’s become a way to have a more sustainable wardrobe too. One of my favorite things about knitting (besides knitting itself), is that so many yarn stores and dyers are small businesses, and that it’s possible to choose yarn that aligns with anything you believe in.  I also love that you can keep unraveling and reknitting your yarn till it’s exactly right.  Outside of crafting, I’m a runner and a rower, and a librarian at a rare book library.  

2. Talk about your first awareness of textile recycling.
I don’t remember a specific first time I learned about textile recycling, probably reading about making quilts from scraps in a book (Anne of Green Gables? Little House in the Big Woods?).  One of the first things you learn about the history of the book (remember, I’m a librarian at a rare book library), is that paper used to be made from recycled rags, but is now made of wood.  Besides all the environmental consequences, the switch from rags to wood lowered the quality of paper, putting most documents from the mid-19th century to mid-20th century at risk.  There were benefits, of course, since paper became cheap enough that everyone could afford books and newspapers, but the product itself was worsened by using new materials.  Learning about that as a grad student was probably one of the first times I realized that a recycled product could be better than one made from new materials.

3. How did you learn about Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.
I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge via Instagram.  

4. What has participation in the challenge meant to you, and why.  Be honest.
The timing of the challenge coincided exactly with the start of the pandemic and start of social distancing in my state, so in general it’s been a wonderful break from thinking about that.  In fact, I think I entered the lottery thinking that if I got a box, playing with that would be a good counterbalance to the cancellation of the spring sheep and wool festivals, which are usually a highlight of this time of year for me.  

It’s also been really inspiring to what everyone else did with their boxes.  I’m usually pretty product-oriented, but the combination of seeing what other people made, the contest itself, and the feeling that I was supposed to experiment has led me to play around more with the contents of the box than I usually do when I knit or sew.  I’m thrilled with my finished bag (which I’ve been imagining myself filling with wool at a future sheep and wool festival), but I’m also excited about continuing to play with the projects I didn’t finish, or even figure out exactly what they are: a basket I wove out of some of my many zippers (it looks really cool, but it’s floppy, scratchy, and held together with pins… what will it be?), and a pom-pom I made from felted sweaters (oops, it looks like one of those dish scrubbers that are basically a foam pom-pom on a plastic handle).

5. What are your two biggest struggles?
I tend to feel like I should finish my “assignments” (work, housework, exercise…) before doing activities that are just for me, so I don’t knit or sew as much as I’d like, because the assignment expands to fill more time.  

I also tend to replay conversations and interactions where I misunderstood someone or accidentally said something insensitive or too harsh, criticizing myself up for having messed up.  I have enough distance to know that it’s never as bad as I think, and to separate myself from the self-criticism, but gosh, it would be easier not to think that way at all!

6. Three things that bring you joy.  Explain
Getting lost in making things, because then I’m only thinking about what I’m doing right then (or will do next).

Making something useful or beautiful out of what seems to be nothing--it’s like magic.  

Blocking and ironing (or steaming), because even more than knitting or sewing in the first place, they transform all the stitches or pieces from separate entities which you stuck together into a single whole.  

7. How can Crispina serve you as we venture forward in this uncertain time?
Show interesting, creative, beautiful things/ideas/practices that help to make the world we want and need.

Scrapbox Contestants - Rebecca Hatcher

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

1. Tell our readers a little about you, and your history, your passion, your work.
I’m primarily a knitter, but in the past several years I have been sewing more and more of my own clothes--at first this was just to have clothes that I liked, but more recently I’ve been buying all my fabric from creative reuse stores, so it’s become a way to have a more sustainable wardrobe too. One of my favorite things about knitting (besides knitting itself), is that so many yarn stores and dyers are small businesses, and that it’s possible to choose yarn that aligns with anything you believe in.  I also love that you can keep unraveling and reknitting your yarn till it’s exactly right.  Outside of crafting, I’m a runner and a rower, and a librarian at a rare book library.  

2. Talk about your first awareness of textile recycling.
I don’t remember a specific first time I learned about textile recycling, probably reading about making quilts from scraps in a book (Anne of Green Gables? Little House in the Big Woods?).  One of the first things you learn about the history of the book (remember, I’m a librarian at a rare book library), is that paper used to be made from recycled rags, but is now made of wood.  Besides all the environmental consequences, the switch from rags to wood lowered the quality of paper, putting most documents from the mid-19th century to mid-20th century at risk.  There were benefits, of course, since paper became cheap enough that everyone could afford books and newspapers, but the product itself was worsened by using new materials.  Learning about that as a grad student was probably one of the first times I realized that a recycled product could be better than one made from new materials.

3. How did you learn about Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.
I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge via Instagram.  

4. What has participation in the challenge meant to you, and why.  Be honest.
The timing of the challenge coincided exactly with the start of the pandemic and start of social distancing in my state, so in general it’s been a wonderful break from thinking about that.  In fact, I think I entered the lottery thinking that if I got a box, playing with that would be a good counterbalance to the cancellation of the spring sheep and wool festivals, which are usually a highlight of this time of year for me.  

It’s also been really inspiring to what everyone else did with their boxes.  I’m usually pretty product-oriented, but the combination of seeing what other people made, the contest itself, and the feeling that I was supposed to experiment has led me to play around more with the contents of the box than I usually do when I knit or sew.  I’m thrilled with my finished bag (which I’ve been imagining myself filling with wool at a future sheep and wool festival), but I’m also excited about continuing to play with the projects I didn’t finish, or even figure out exactly what they are: a basket I wove out of some of my many zippers (it looks really cool, but it’s floppy, scratchy, and held together with pins… what will it be?), and a pom-pom I made from felted sweaters (oops, it looks like one of those dish scrubbers that are basically a foam pom-pom on a plastic handle).

5. What are your two biggest struggles?
I tend to feel like I should finish my “assignments” (work, housework, exercise…) before doing activities that are just for me, so I don’t knit or sew as much as I’d like, because the assignment expands to fill more time.  

I also tend to replay conversations and interactions where I misunderstood someone or accidentally said something insensitive or too harsh, criticizing myself up for having messed up.  I have enough distance to know that it’s never as bad as I think, and to separate myself from the self-criticism, but gosh, it would be easier not to think that way at all!

6. Three things that bring you joy.  Explain
Getting lost in making things, because then I’m only thinking about what I’m doing right then (or will do next).

Making something useful or beautiful out of what seems to be nothing--it’s like magic.  

Blocking and ironing (or steaming), because even more than knitting or sewing in the first place, they transform all the stitches or pieces from separate entities which you stuck together into a single whole.  

7. How can Crispina serve you as we venture forward in this uncertain time?
Show interesting, creative, beautiful things/ideas/practices that help to make the world we want and need.

BACK
TO
BLOG
<<