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Hey Welcome! I’m Crispina ffrench
Artist, Educator, Empowerer, Plant Eater,
Nature Lover, Cookie Baker, Climate Change Activist
I’m glad you are here, Now let’s make shift happen.

Scrapbox Contestants - Mimi Hassett

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

My name is Mimi Hassett and I hail from Housatonic, Massachusetts just down the road from Crispina.  I always tell folks that 'Textiles are my mental health'. I enjoy the multitudes of textures, prints, and weaves one can find in fibers. My paying job was a profession in nursing.  I practiced in a number of settings ER, Hospice, informatics, international transport, teaching and administration. I learned that networking was the best way to learn and improve while giving back to people is the most important thing to remember.


My textile adventures began in Washington, DC where I started altering clothing. The fabrics were very unique and wonderful but folks never wanted their scraps returned. So I started quilting. The quilting evolved into making T-shirt quilts. I marvel at the artwork one can find in the logos on a simple T-shirt. The memory quilts I made for people were so much fun. And the stories the T-shirts elicited from the owners were always impressive.


I think the way I became aware of textile recycling was first the reuse of the alteration scraps into quilts and then designing memory quilts out of Tshirts collections. But also truth be told, I saw Crispina's work years ago and took my inspiration from her creations.


I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge while reading Crispina's blog and was excited to participate. It gave me an opportunity to experiment with different ways to use my quilting, needle felting,  and sewing skills while designing with fabrics I would not necessarily chosen for my projects. I have a new appreciation for leftover scrap pieces that might be tossed away. Leftovers can take on a life of their own and feed the creative soul to produce something you never would have imagined with your routine fabrics and patterns.


My biggest struggle with the challenge was the variety of "scraps" in unpredictable shapes, and the mishmash of wool, silks,corduroy,  linen, and buttons / notions. I had to develop a plan to incorporate the scraps in a way I never had done before. But I have to admit I loved working outside the box so to speak and as the Cornavirus began to rear its ugly head, the design and sewiglng work distracted me. My other struggle was finding time after the first couple of weeks.  As a former ER nurse, I realized my sewing skills were needed elsewhere and began making masks. However, there was an overlap I the challenge as I was determined to use my leftover mask scraps to create something.  That something was a "whatever" stitched piece that I mailed to friends and more. The whatever piece not only incorporated the scraps from the masks but also a button from a jar found found in the house my mom grew up in is seen on each. The piece also provides some stress relief as the recipient can continue to fray the edges and add to the design.


Three things I enjoy are working with textiles, networking with people,  and being in the Berkshires.  The challenge certainly supported the textile angle and networking. I loved meeting everyone on line and seeing all the different creations folks designed. I learned a lot from the discussions and seeing the pictures. As for being in the Berkshires, it has provided a 'hug' in these difficult times. Neighbors looking out for each other, a place to walk, and green spaces to enjoy. Lots to encourage contentment and creative work.


In the future. I will look forward to continuing to learn more about the practical insight you have to teach and encourage people in practical and fun ways to have people look differently at what they would normally  cast aside.


For the challenge, I made a number of items. I decided to enter my wall hanging creations. I am particularly proud of these because the images were made from scraps in their actual form. In fact it was by looking at the scrap that I imagined what it could be. I then selected a scrap fabric from the box as the background to highlight the evolving "picture". Assembly was accomplished using a variety of techniques: needle felting (a newly acquired skill) and machine/hand stitching. I used only fabric from the box.  Nothing added. And it was so much fun.


Thanks for the opportunity to participate!


Scrapbox Contestants - Mimi Hassett

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

My name is Mimi Hassett and I hail from Housatonic, Massachusetts just down the road from Crispina.  I always tell folks that 'Textiles are my mental health'. I enjoy the multitudes of textures, prints, and weaves one can find in fibers. My paying job was a profession in nursing.  I practiced in a number of settings ER, Hospice, informatics, international transport, teaching and administration. I learned that networking was the best way to learn and improve while giving back to people is the most important thing to remember.


My textile adventures began in Washington, DC where I started altering clothing. The fabrics were very unique and wonderful but folks never wanted their scraps returned. So I started quilting. The quilting evolved into making T-shirt quilts. I marvel at the artwork one can find in the logos on a simple T-shirt. The memory quilts I made for people were so much fun. And the stories the T-shirts elicited from the owners were always impressive.


I think the way I became aware of textile recycling was first the reuse of the alteration scraps into quilts and then designing memory quilts out of Tshirts collections. But also truth be told, I saw Crispina's work years ago and took my inspiration from her creations.


I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge while reading Crispina's blog and was excited to participate. It gave me an opportunity to experiment with different ways to use my quilting, needle felting,  and sewing skills while designing with fabrics I would not necessarily chosen for my projects. I have a new appreciation for leftover scrap pieces that might be tossed away. Leftovers can take on a life of their own and feed the creative soul to produce something you never would have imagined with your routine fabrics and patterns.


My biggest struggle with the challenge was the variety of "scraps" in unpredictable shapes, and the mishmash of wool, silks,corduroy,  linen, and buttons / notions. I had to develop a plan to incorporate the scraps in a way I never had done before. But I have to admit I loved working outside the box so to speak and as the Cornavirus began to rear its ugly head, the design and sewiglng work distracted me. My other struggle was finding time after the first couple of weeks.  As a former ER nurse, I realized my sewing skills were needed elsewhere and began making masks. However, there was an overlap I the challenge as I was determined to use my leftover mask scraps to create something.  That something was a "whatever" stitched piece that I mailed to friends and more. The whatever piece not only incorporated the scraps from the masks but also a button from a jar found found in the house my mom grew up in is seen on each. The piece also provides some stress relief as the recipient can continue to fray the edges and add to the design.


Three things I enjoy are working with textiles, networking with people,  and being in the Berkshires.  The challenge certainly supported the textile angle and networking. I loved meeting everyone on line and seeing all the different creations folks designed. I learned a lot from the discussions and seeing the pictures. As for being in the Berkshires, it has provided a 'hug' in these difficult times. Neighbors looking out for each other, a place to walk, and green spaces to enjoy. Lots to encourage contentment and creative work.


In the future. I will look forward to continuing to learn more about the practical insight you have to teach and encourage people in practical and fun ways to have people look differently at what they would normally  cast aside.


For the challenge, I made a number of items. I decided to enter my wall hanging creations. I am particularly proud of these because the images were made from scraps in their actual form. In fact it was by looking at the scrap that I imagined what it could be. I then selected a scrap fabric from the box as the background to highlight the evolving "picture". Assembly was accomplished using a variety of techniques: needle felting (a newly acquired skill) and machine/hand stitching. I used only fabric from the box.  Nothing added. And it was so much fun.


Thanks for the opportunity to participate!


Scrapbox Contestants - Mimi Hassett

A couple times a day for the next week or so you will find features right here about the creative adventurers who jumped, with both feet into the wild world of textile recycling by joining me for Crispina’s Scrapbox Challenge 2020.  This came about due to the overflowing scrap bins in my ‘zero-waste’ company and my lack of time and focus to use said material to develop new product.  

The call went out on March 1, 2020 and applications stayed open for a solid week.  The response was AMAZING!  Limited only by the volume of scrap in my studio, we chose 50 people at random from the pool, to participate in the challenge.

Crispina's Scrapbox Challenge is part recycling ingenuity, part creative high-jinx and part design competition. Online voting kicks off right here on Earthday. One GRAND PRIZE winner and three runners up will be chosen by voters. Bookmark this link and be sure to participate by voting!

My name is Mimi Hassett and I hail from Housatonic, Massachusetts just down the road from Crispina.  I always tell folks that 'Textiles are my mental health'. I enjoy the multitudes of textures, prints, and weaves one can find in fibers. My paying job was a profession in nursing.  I practiced in a number of settings ER, Hospice, informatics, international transport, teaching and administration. I learned that networking was the best way to learn and improve while giving back to people is the most important thing to remember.


My textile adventures began in Washington, DC where I started altering clothing. The fabrics were very unique and wonderful but folks never wanted their scraps returned. So I started quilting. The quilting evolved into making T-shirt quilts. I marvel at the artwork one can find in the logos on a simple T-shirt. The memory quilts I made for people were so much fun. And the stories the T-shirts elicited from the owners were always impressive.


I think the way I became aware of textile recycling was first the reuse of the alteration scraps into quilts and then designing memory quilts out of Tshirts collections. But also truth be told, I saw Crispina's work years ago and took my inspiration from her creations.


I learned about the Scrapbox Challenge while reading Crispina's blog and was excited to participate. It gave me an opportunity to experiment with different ways to use my quilting, needle felting,  and sewing skills while designing with fabrics I would not necessarily chosen for my projects. I have a new appreciation for leftover scrap pieces that might be tossed away. Leftovers can take on a life of their own and feed the creative soul to produce something you never would have imagined with your routine fabrics and patterns.


My biggest struggle with the challenge was the variety of "scraps" in unpredictable shapes, and the mishmash of wool, silks,corduroy,  linen, and buttons / notions. I had to develop a plan to incorporate the scraps in a way I never had done before. But I have to admit I loved working outside the box so to speak and as the Cornavirus began to rear its ugly head, the design and sewiglng work distracted me. My other struggle was finding time after the first couple of weeks.  As a former ER nurse, I realized my sewing skills were needed elsewhere and began making masks. However, there was an overlap I the challenge as I was determined to use my leftover mask scraps to create something.  That something was a "whatever" stitched piece that I mailed to friends and more. The whatever piece not only incorporated the scraps from the masks but also a button from a jar found found in the house my mom grew up in is seen on each. The piece also provides some stress relief as the recipient can continue to fray the edges and add to the design.


Three things I enjoy are working with textiles, networking with people,  and being in the Berkshires.  The challenge certainly supported the textile angle and networking. I loved meeting everyone on line and seeing all the different creations folks designed. I learned a lot from the discussions and seeing the pictures. As for being in the Berkshires, it has provided a 'hug' in these difficult times. Neighbors looking out for each other, a place to walk, and green spaces to enjoy. Lots to encourage contentment and creative work.


In the future. I will look forward to continuing to learn more about the practical insight you have to teach and encourage people in practical and fun ways to have people look differently at what they would normally  cast aside.


For the challenge, I made a number of items. I decided to enter my wall hanging creations. I am particularly proud of these because the images were made from scraps in their actual form. In fact it was by looking at the scrap that I imagined what it could be. I then selected a scrap fabric from the box as the background to highlight the evolving "picture". Assembly was accomplished using a variety of techniques: needle felting (a newly acquired skill) and machine/hand stitching. I used only fabric from the box.  Nothing added. And it was so much fun.


Thanks for the opportunity to participate!


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