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Hey Welcome! I’m Crispina ffrench
Artist, Educator, Empowerer, Plant Eater,
Nature Lover, Cookie Baker, Climate Change Activist
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Make Your Own Deodorant - Guest Post

Yup, you read that right!  Today longtime follower, Diane Hosier shares her acumen for making her own health and beauty products. Here she is:

Hello, Diane here.

My daughter calls me Hippiegranola. After years of abusing the environment and my body, I have turned to using more natural things.From homemade cough remedies, toothpaste, deodorants, to laundry detergent, I try to be as chemically free as possible. I recycle, reuse, and reuse again. I put up food, canning, freezing, pickling and dehydrating. I’m here to tell you a bit about that and share some thoughts and recipes.

My first is deodorant. Ever since I was a little girl, I had sensitive skin. I suffered from psoriasis and eczema. The old-fashioned remedy for this was lanolin--fresh lanolin from sheep skin. I remember my mother smearing it all over the affected parts of my body, inside my elbows and on the back of my knees. It was nasty, it was smelly, it was just plain gross.

When I got to be a teenager and was told I needed to use deodorant, I was in a pickle. If I used commercial deodorant, I broke out in a rash or I had trouble breathing because, at that time, most  deodorants were  aerosol. They came out with roll-on deodorants, literally with a ball in a tube, which was sticky. As my friends sprayed Right Guard  in the air around me......I smelled.

I turned to baby powder...that was a disaster. Talc was worse. Finally I stole cornstarch from my mothers kitchen. It worked but was messy--I puffed clouds, it made my dark clothes dusty. They finally began to manufacture more skin- and environmentally- friendly deodorants. I found Arm & Hammer baking soda deodorant in the  90’s, which seemed to work OK but it wasn’t perfect.  I used that for  quite a few years until it kind of stopped working.

I decided to figure out something different. I used baking soda for the deodorizer and cornstarch for the anti-moisture. I’d mix them together in equal parts. They were still messy, but worked. After a bit of research I found that coconut oil, used as a binder, was perfect. My first mixture was equal parts of just baking soda and coconut oil, because that was my toothpaste! (That is another story!) It was a little rough, so adding cornstarch smoothed it out. After tons of experimenting, I reduced the baking soda.

More recently I found people sharing recipes on Pinterest and Facebook for making their own deodorants. I had already been doing this for quite a while, so I checked out some of the recipes and then I tweaked mine a little bit. More research brought me to arrowroot. (I like arrowroot for a thickener in cooking much better than cornstarch.)Arrowroot is a starchy thickener, a white powder-like material. Its main purpose is to thicken sauces, but does the same in the deodorant. Arrowroot has also been know to draw out toxins and impurities.

So here is my recipe:

1/4 cup of baking soda                          

1/3 cup of solid coconut oil                          

1/4 cup arrowroot powder                            

1/8 cup cornstarch

You can add essential oils if you like.

Mix the arrowroot, baking soda and corn starch together. I warmed the coconut oil up a little bit so it’s liquid and then add it to the dry ingredients and use a pastry blender or a fork to mix it together. Some people find it easier to put it in a mixer or blender, but I don’t like to clean up a blender so I don’t use one. Be sure to use virgin unrefined coconut oil. Experiment with the amounts until you’re happy with them, because nothing is set in stone. I keep mine in a jelly jar or other glass jar with a lid. Use a wooden tongue depressor or similar to scoop it out. You only need a pea- sized amount. A hint: do not rub it in; that is where the irritation from the soda comes in. Let it melt and smooth it around gently. I find, since I keep my house cold, it is too solid some days. Set the jar near heat for a bit to soften it. The coconut oil melts at 85 F, so just hold it in your hand. I hope you find this helpful and good luck with your deodorant making.

Next time: Laundry Detergents

Make Your Own Deodorant - Guest Post

Yup, you read that right!  Today longtime follower, Diane Hosier shares her acumen for making her own health and beauty products. Here she is:

Hello, Diane here.

My daughter calls me Hippiegranola. After years of abusing the environment and my body, I have turned to using more natural things.From homemade cough remedies, toothpaste, deodorants, to laundry detergent, I try to be as chemically free as possible. I recycle, reuse, and reuse again. I put up food, canning, freezing, pickling and dehydrating. I’m here to tell you a bit about that and share some thoughts and recipes.

My first is deodorant. Ever since I was a little girl, I had sensitive skin. I suffered from psoriasis and eczema. The old-fashioned remedy for this was lanolin--fresh lanolin from sheep skin. I remember my mother smearing it all over the affected parts of my body, inside my elbows and on the back of my knees. It was nasty, it was smelly, it was just plain gross.

When I got to be a teenager and was told I needed to use deodorant, I was in a pickle. If I used commercial deodorant, I broke out in a rash or I had trouble breathing because, at that time, most  deodorants were  aerosol. They came out with roll-on deodorants, literally with a ball in a tube, which was sticky. As my friends sprayed Right Guard  in the air around me......I smelled.

I turned to baby powder...that was a disaster. Talc was worse. Finally I stole cornstarch from my mothers kitchen. It worked but was messy--I puffed clouds, it made my dark clothes dusty. They finally began to manufacture more skin- and environmentally- friendly deodorants. I found Arm & Hammer baking soda deodorant in the  90’s, which seemed to work OK but it wasn’t perfect.  I used that for  quite a few years until it kind of stopped working.

I decided to figure out something different. I used baking soda for the deodorizer and cornstarch for the anti-moisture. I’d mix them together in equal parts. They were still messy, but worked. After a bit of research I found that coconut oil, used as a binder, was perfect. My first mixture was equal parts of just baking soda and coconut oil, because that was my toothpaste! (That is another story!) It was a little rough, so adding cornstarch smoothed it out. After tons of experimenting, I reduced the baking soda.

More recently I found people sharing recipes on Pinterest and Facebook for making their own deodorants. I had already been doing this for quite a while, so I checked out some of the recipes and then I tweaked mine a little bit. More research brought me to arrowroot. (I like arrowroot for a thickener in cooking much better than cornstarch.)Arrowroot is a starchy thickener, a white powder-like material. Its main purpose is to thicken sauces, but does the same in the deodorant. Arrowroot has also been know to draw out toxins and impurities.

So here is my recipe:

1/4 cup of baking soda                          

1/3 cup of solid coconut oil                          

1/4 cup arrowroot powder                            

1/8 cup cornstarch

You can add essential oils if you like.

Mix the arrowroot, baking soda and corn starch together. I warmed the coconut oil up a little bit so it’s liquid and then add it to the dry ingredients and use a pastry blender or a fork to mix it together. Some people find it easier to put it in a mixer or blender, but I don’t like to clean up a blender so I don’t use one. Be sure to use virgin unrefined coconut oil. Experiment with the amounts until you’re happy with them, because nothing is set in stone. I keep mine in a jelly jar or other glass jar with a lid. Use a wooden tongue depressor or similar to scoop it out. You only need a pea- sized amount. A hint: do not rub it in; that is where the irritation from the soda comes in. Let it melt and smooth it around gently. I find, since I keep my house cold, it is too solid some days. Set the jar near heat for a bit to soften it. The coconut oil melts at 85 F, so just hold it in your hand. I hope you find this helpful and good luck with your deodorant making.

Next time: Laundry Detergents

Make Your Own Deodorant - Guest Post

Yup, you read that right!  Today longtime follower, Diane Hosier shares her acumen for making her own health and beauty products. Here she is:

Hello, Diane here.

My daughter calls me Hippiegranola. After years of abusing the environment and my body, I have turned to using more natural things.From homemade cough remedies, toothpaste, deodorants, to laundry detergent, I try to be as chemically free as possible. I recycle, reuse, and reuse again. I put up food, canning, freezing, pickling and dehydrating. I’m here to tell you a bit about that and share some thoughts and recipes.

My first is deodorant. Ever since I was a little girl, I had sensitive skin. I suffered from psoriasis and eczema. The old-fashioned remedy for this was lanolin--fresh lanolin from sheep skin. I remember my mother smearing it all over the affected parts of my body, inside my elbows and on the back of my knees. It was nasty, it was smelly, it was just plain gross.

When I got to be a teenager and was told I needed to use deodorant, I was in a pickle. If I used commercial deodorant, I broke out in a rash or I had trouble breathing because, at that time, most  deodorants were  aerosol. They came out with roll-on deodorants, literally with a ball in a tube, which was sticky. As my friends sprayed Right Guard  in the air around me......I smelled.

I turned to baby powder...that was a disaster. Talc was worse. Finally I stole cornstarch from my mothers kitchen. It worked but was messy--I puffed clouds, it made my dark clothes dusty. They finally began to manufacture more skin- and environmentally- friendly deodorants. I found Arm & Hammer baking soda deodorant in the  90’s, which seemed to work OK but it wasn’t perfect.  I used that for  quite a few years until it kind of stopped working.

I decided to figure out something different. I used baking soda for the deodorizer and cornstarch for the anti-moisture. I’d mix them together in equal parts. They were still messy, but worked. After a bit of research I found that coconut oil, used as a binder, was perfect. My first mixture was equal parts of just baking soda and coconut oil, because that was my toothpaste! (That is another story!) It was a little rough, so adding cornstarch smoothed it out. After tons of experimenting, I reduced the baking soda.

More recently I found people sharing recipes on Pinterest and Facebook for making their own deodorants. I had already been doing this for quite a while, so I checked out some of the recipes and then I tweaked mine a little bit. More research brought me to arrowroot. (I like arrowroot for a thickener in cooking much better than cornstarch.)Arrowroot is a starchy thickener, a white powder-like material. Its main purpose is to thicken sauces, but does the same in the deodorant. Arrowroot has also been know to draw out toxins and impurities.

So here is my recipe:

1/4 cup of baking soda                          

1/3 cup of solid coconut oil                          

1/4 cup arrowroot powder                            

1/8 cup cornstarch

You can add essential oils if you like.

Mix the arrowroot, baking soda and corn starch together. I warmed the coconut oil up a little bit so it’s liquid and then add it to the dry ingredients and use a pastry blender or a fork to mix it together. Some people find it easier to put it in a mixer or blender, but I don’t like to clean up a blender so I don’t use one. Be sure to use virgin unrefined coconut oil. Experiment with the amounts until you’re happy with them, because nothing is set in stone. I keep mine in a jelly jar or other glass jar with a lid. Use a wooden tongue depressor or similar to scoop it out. You only need a pea- sized amount. A hint: do not rub it in; that is where the irritation from the soda comes in. Let it melt and smooth it around gently. I find, since I keep my house cold, it is too solid some days. Set the jar near heat for a bit to soften it. The coconut oil melts at 85 F, so just hold it in your hand. I hope you find this helpful and good luck with your deodorant making.

Next time: Laundry Detergents

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